Tani Michiho: Japanese Girl Who Learn About Islam

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At a glance, she looks like a student of UIN Jakarta in general. She fluently speaking in Indonesia and the veils she wear, makes Tani Michiho looks more ‘Indonesia’.

She was born in Otsu, Shiga, Osaka, on October 12th 1994. Michiho grow ups in a Buddhist Japan family. But, her study in Indonesian Language Department, School of Foreign Students, makes her more curious about Indonesia and the culture of its’ Muslim society.

Reading both booksand magazines in Indonesian language either in so many themes makes her want to get closer with Indonesia. “Everything makes me curious about Indonesia and the culture of its’ Muslim society directly,” she said.

Not long after, Michiho offered by Darmasiswa RI Program. This program gives her scholarship to learn about language, culture, music, and handicraft of Indonesia in one of universities in Indonesia for one full year.

After she passed the selection, Michiho surely choose UIN Jakarta as her destination among the other universities. Her reason is pure, in addition to study about Indonesian language, she could deeply know about Muslim society closer. “That’s why I choose UIN Jakarta,” she said.

In UIN Jakarta, Michiho choose to study in Department of Islamic Culture and History, Faculty of Adab and Humanities. Besides language, courses with many lecturers and various students, makes Michiho learn about many things.

From the students of boarding school, for example, Michiho can learn about Islam and Arabic language once in a time. In fact, the diversity of students’ background also helps Michiho to learn a bit much about some local languages, such as, Java, Betawi, even Sunda.

By the students who have dual role as ‘local language teacher’, frequently Michiho called by the girls’ nickname that suits their local language. “By Sundanese friends, I called by Neng Michi,” she blushed. (Luthfy R. Fikri & Tutur A. Mustofa) Translated by: mahar